Are You Afraid of Losing Your Power? I Am.

Would you be happy to be treated the same way as a black person in America today? I wouldn’t.

White privilege has it’s perks: Not being followed around a store because the sales person thinks I”m a thief. Assuming I’m safe if I’m stopped by a cop. Having the edge in job interviews.

But if I acknowledge that I don’t want to be treated like black peeps are, I’m admitting ” [I] know what’s happening, [I] know I don’t want it for myself. So why am I allowing it to happen to others.”  Quote/paraphrase: Anti-Racist white activist Jane Elliott

And that brings up the reason many of us aren’t “spending our privilege,” we’re afraid. (Spending Privilege-using your power as part of the dominant group to advocate for/uplift those from a subdominant group.)

Afraid to lose our jobs, afraid we’ll offend, afraid we’ll lose our power. And let’s face it, being the privileged dominant group has its appeal.

I’m afraid. When a lit agent will only read submissions from  marginalized voices for a whole month, a part of me is frustrated/afraid. Does this mean being white will be held against me when it comes to getting my book published? Making it even harder for me to achieve my dream, which is already hard enough? 

Then I think, “Welcome to racism. This is a tiny taste of what it’s like to have your skin color used against you. Sucks, huh?”

So I push through my initial fear/anger and remind myself that it’s persistence that will get me to my goal. As Harrison Ford said when asked why he made it when many of his peers didn’t: “I never gave up.” And that marginalized voices having been largely ignored all these years deserve to be heard in a big way. Which then reminds me of my main purpose in life. To leave this planet better than I found it. That includes being a good ally to all subdominant groups. (*dominant/subdominant groups are a less emotional and more encompassing way to explain our social hierarchy per Audre Lorde.)

Being a good ally means not giving into the fear we all have around loss of power. Means opening up to the possibility that there’s enough power to go around. Life doesn’t have to be a zero sum game, though it feels like it at times.

How do you be a good ally? Call in (calling someone out BUT in private) your boss/colleague if they don’t treat your black colleague the same way as you. (I’m hoping that ‘calling them in’ will result in us keeping our jobs.) 

Listen to black folks when they’re sharing what it’s like to be black in America. Listen to their stories, however uncomfortable they may be. Use what they taught you to intervene the next time someone is treating a black person unfairly for no reason.

If you’re an educator/parent/caregiver, talk to kids about race at a much earlier age than you think you should. (By 4 or 5, they already notice differences like skin color.) A great picture book for younger kids about what’s happening now is NOT MY IDEA.

You get the picture, right?

Why am I telling you all this? Because I keep hearing over and over again that the best thing I can do as a white person is to talk to other white people about spending our privilege. About making changes in our spheres of influence every day. Baby steps turn into a thousand steps over time. And if each of us do baby steps? That’s a lotta miles covered! 🙂

P.S. Youtube vid on the way. Because talking to each other about racism is such an important and sensitive topic, we are still working on this week’s offering regarding how to deal with one’s fear around losing power etc.

If you like what you’re reading, please subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you want to fear LESS and LAUGH more.

 Questions, comments, suggestions can  reach me via replying to this letter, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel.

 
#SlayFear

Weekly Rad Resource From The Library: Please borrow either digitally, or in person if preferred and allowed, this terrific book that helped me understand what’s going on between blacks and whites. Note: I still have a looong way to go in my understanding.


Posted in Books, Diversity, Empowerment, Fear, Inclusion, Rad Resource, Thinking Outside The Box, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , by with no comments yet.

WHAT I LEARNED AT THE LIBRARY

Lucky am I to have been hired as a Youth Services Library Associate at Winnetka Library! If you live in the area, you’ll know where to find me. That is when the library re-opens. For now, here I am.

Libraries have gone way beyond their original purpose, and now often serve as the community centers for their patrons. For ex. did you know you can borrow ebooks from libraries at any time? Just download FREE apps like hoopla using your library card number. Also, some libraries feed kids after school snacks, register voters, host seminars on biz topics, provide hours of entertaining, educational enrichment for little and big kids alike…ALL FOR FREE! (My library even gives out STEAM kits.)

I’m getting access to all kinds of neat library resources. So when I learn or do something new, I’m gonna share it here with all of you.

For my first share, I’d like to give you all the tools to create ‘STORYTIME’ at home with your kids. (If you are ‘big kids,’ take what I’ve shared here and make a DIY book club kit. I’ll be doing those for older kids later on.) The idea is to get off your screens for a while, and do something in real life. (Though some of the offerings do require a screen.) All of the suggestions here are either free or very inexpensive.

So without further ado, here’s my first Storytime kit using the picture book, I’M BORED by Michael Ian Black and Debbie Ridpath Ohi. Seemed like a timely book for these times. 🙂

DIY STORYTIME KIT

I’M BORED is a fun, clever story about a little girl rediscovering the power of imagination once she’s called boring by a potato. Yep, a potato. The bold, emotional illustrations bring the text to the next level, while giving kids ideas of what to do next so they’re not bored even after the story ends.

  1. WATCH: Michael Ian Black read the story, and then Debbie Ridpath Ohi (illustrator) offers an art demo and creative challenge at timestamp 5:17.
  2. Other book related activities to extend your learning:

READ: The Boring Book by Shinsuke Yoshitake (Available on Hoopla) This LOL picture book uses the feeling of boredom as a doorway into an engaging and enriching experience.

-PRINT READY ACTIVITY SHEETS, including how to make finger puppets and coloring pages

https://www.debbieohi.com/im-bored-activity-pages/

-MAKE POTATO ART

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/children/potato-craft-ideas-for-kids.htm

https://www.fun-stuff-to-do.com/easy-crafts-for-kids-8.html

Potato Sprout People

https://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-and-experiments/potato-sprout-people

Potato Book Characters:

http://fourcheekymonkeys.com/play-love-learn/read-play-learn-potato-book-characters/

-DANCE AND SING while learning about Flamingos, do they fly, where do they live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsUWR9hkT5M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhNrC0VjzMU

ENCOURAGE IMAGINATIVE PLAY

https://www.horizoneducationcenters.org/blog/5-easy-ways-to-encourage-imaginative-play

Make an Imagination Prop Box:

-Consider creating a prop box or corner filled with objects to spark your child’s fantasy world. You might include:

Large plastic crates, cardboard blocks, or a large, empty box for creating a “home”

  • Old clothes, shoes, backpacks, hats
  • Old telephones, phone books, magazines
  • Cooking utensils, dishes, plastic food containers, table napkins, silk flowers
  • Stuffed animals and dolls of all sizes
  • Fabric pieces, blankets, or old sheets for making costumes or a fort
  • Theme-appropriate materials such as postcards, used plane tickets, foreign coins, and photos for a pretend vacation trip
  • Writing materials for taking phone messages, leaving notes, and making shopping lists

IF YOU’VE GOT MORE TIME:

Teacher Guide for kids 5-10 yrs old using book to teach ideas in most subjects including: Math, English, Science, Art etc.

http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/605335/24139138/1388670294790/IM+BORED+Guide-v2.pdf?token=bt%2F%2FYt4wh9tTG%2FcXxwEYyMJVfeI%3D

Don’t forget to have fun!


Posted in Creativity, Inspired Creativity, PLAY, Rad Resource, Thinking Outside The Box, Uncategorized and tagged , , , by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids: What Do You Know About Your Past?

Do you know what your family or community is built upon? In other words, do you know all about your past?

Most of us don’t. Yet our pasts still run us whether we know about it or not. The obvious one is genetics. But many family/community beliefs and/or dysfunctions come from the past too.

If you learn about your past, perhaps it can help you build a better future, or understand why you behave the way you do, or even help keep your community together.

A point of Natasha Tarpley’s middle grade book, Harlem Charade, is that the past should be preserved, not thrown out like yesterday’s news.

Tomorrow in a our book review, you will meet Elvin, Jin, and Alex whose journey into the past helps them solve a present mystery; why was Elvin’s grandfather attacked. It may also save Harlem.

In the meantime, here’s a fact about my past that I literally learned today from my cousin who’s visiting from Atlanta…I have southern blood in me, unfortunately, it’s not Nawlins blood. 🙁

Apparently, some of my ancestors hail from Corinth, Mississippi. They built and owned a department store called Rubels. I’m not sure how it affects me yet, but it may explain my love of buttermilk fried chicken and fried green tomatoes, or Southern Gothic settings.

Rubels circa 1874

Do you know a fun fact about your past? How does it affect you? Please share with me by replying to this letter or tweeting me. I may even post some of your comments under our YouTube book review tomorrow.

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Week:
Purple Harlem Street Art


Posted in Acceptance, Books, Diversity, Empowerment, Inclusion, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids: Ada Twist and Curiosity

Tomorrow we’ll drop a book review on you, but it won’t hurt.  I promise.

The subject of said book review is Ada Twist, Scientist. Tho written for younger readers, 5-7 yrs old, Ada teaches the rest of us some important lessons too. The value of curiosity and support. You’ll see how in tomorrow’s vid.

What isn’t in the vid is the bio of the woman mathematician/scientist that inspired Ada’s name: Ada Lovelace.

Ada Lovelace, born in 1815 is considered the first computer programmer because she could see that computing machines could do more than just calculate numbers. She wrote extensive notes on the potential for using Charles Babbage’s Analytical Computer in areas not previously imagined, which introduced many computer concepts. She was also the poet Lord Byron’s only legitimate child.

It was her curiosity about all things, and her openness to innovation that paved the way for the computers we use today.

Like her predecessor, Ada Twist sees potential in asking “Why” and then falling down the rabbit hole to see where her curiosity takes her.

Do you have a favorite STEM hero or heroine? I’d love to hear about it!

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Week:
Purple Computer Codes


Posted in Acceptance, Books, Diversity, EmpowerGirlsOfAllAges, Inclusion, Self-Acceptance, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Life Begins When You Get Back Up, Revisiting After The Fall By Dan Santat

Two years ago I went extra crazy.(Hormones can be very mean.)

The anxiety I inherited at birth skyrocketed. It got so bad that I could barely eat, leaving me too weak to leave the house for about six weeks. It was the second ‘dark night’ I’d experienced in my life, and just like the other one, I came out of it with wisdom that changed my life.

I realized that without peace of mind, nothing else mattered. Without peace of mind, I couldn’t create the life I wanted. I couldn’t be the person I wanted. Ultimately, I couldn’t really live.

The problem with anxiety is that it forces you to make your life small. The terror that comes when your anxiety is triggered is so overwhelming, you’ll do anything to avoid whatever freaks you out.

Humpty Dumpty suffers from anxiety too. After he falls off the wall, he becomes afraid of heights. This new phobia immediately robs him of his favorite activity, his favorite cereal and other things. I’ll stop here so as not to spoil the rest of the story for you.

Because kids dance with anxiety too, Dan’s picture book is for all ages.

This book is important because Dan takes mental illness out of the closet, and shows the stages we can go through on our way to getting back up again. And he does it in a subtle, powerful way without preaching.

As Dan says, “Fear is a really tough beast to tackle.” Maybe because Dan has had a front row seat to his wife’s journey through anxiety and back out the other side, he can stand in our shoes a little bit.

If I could, I’d give this book to everyone I know, and ask them to do the same.

I wanted to revisit this book with Christina, who hadn’t read it, because now that we’ve wrapped up play as a way into acceptance, recap video here, Christina and I will be looking at how fear and acceptance intersect.

Please watch or listen to our review, which I’ll post on our channel tomorrow. If it resonates with you, go out and buy my favorite picture book of all time. (At least so far.)

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:

Purple Cereal

 

 

 

 


Posted in Acceptance, Books, choose acceptance, Empowerment, Self-Acceptance, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids: Anny & Christina tackle Colby Sharp’s The Creativity Project

On the surface, Colby Sharp is a 5th grade teacher in Parma, MI. But scratch the surface a little bit, and you find out he is so much more.

For one, he’s a rockstar in the kidlit world. Among his achievements is Nerd Camp, which he, his wife, and a team of volunteers run every year in Parma, MI. It’s main goal is to promote a love of reading in children. In order to do that, Colby and Alaina realize they have to educate us too–us being writers, educators, parents, aunts etc. So the first two days of Nerd Camp is jam packed with chats and workshops led by some of the leading lights in kidlit and kid education. (R. J. Palacio, Wonder, Tracey Baptiste, Jumbies, and Debbie Ridpath Ohi, one of my fav illustrators, teacher Chad Everett)

I had the pleasure of attending the event last year. Two takeaways of many: Discovered why it’s vital not to classify books by gender, i.e. ‘boy’ or ‘girl’ books, but to encourage kids to read whatever strikes their fancy. For one thing, a boy reading a book about girls can help him gain empathy for what it’s like to be a girl in our world, and vice versa. This wisdom supplied by the best-selling Fantasy author Shannon Hale (Princess Academy among others.) Met and learned about how to talk about and promote diversity in the kidtlit world from librarian Kathy Burnette, who is starting The Brain Lair, a diverse bookstore in South Bend, IN.

Colby’s latest contribution to kids, and the rest of us, is The Creativity Project. Colby asked well-known kidlit writers and illustrators to supply creative prompts for each other, and then use those prompts to create a short story or illustration. You see the fruits of the creators’ labor, and then there are about 40 prompts in the back of the book created for us, the readers. (Of course you can do any of the prompts in the book.)

For this week’s vid, Christina and I each did a prompt. Not only were we pleased with the results, but more importantly, they allowed us to stretch our creative wings. Colby’s book reawakens, or strengthens your creativity muscles. And creativity leads to innovation, a stronger and more diverse community, learning, and so much more. In my case, I discovered something new about my Uncle Earl.

I hope you’ll listen or watch our video about the Creativity Project when it posts tomorrow. For now, here’s a moment from the video: Uncle Earl and the journal I used to write his story.

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
A purple Hummingbird


Posted in Acceptance, Books, Creativity, Empowerment, Imagination, Inspired Creativity, PLAY, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids, Barbara Binns, Blue Spaghetti and #OwnVoices

Barbara Binns is a unique children’s author. She is obviously female, but she writes from a male point of view. In fact her website’s tagline is: Stories of Real Boys Growing Into Real Men…and the people who love them.

She even teaches a course for female writers who want to learn to write from the male point of view. (I should probably take it. I hear it’s terrific!)

Writing from another gender, or race’s point of view is tricky. They say write what you know, but how can you fully stand in the shoes of another who is so different from yourself?

This is a big debate right now in children’s literature too. It’s called #OwnVoices. There are those that believe we can only tell our “own” stories and others who believe that if we do the deep research, and get a ‘sensitivity reader,’ one who is from that gender or race or country etc., to vet our book, then it’s okay.

For ex. J.K. Rowling’s book The History of Magic In North America which is up on Pottermore was crucified by Native American scholars/writers. Debbie Reese,who writes the blog American Indians in Children’s Literature, which carefully reviews young people’s literature with representations of American Indians said, “I don’t think she has the knowledge necessary to do justice to marginalized peoples.”

In my opinioin, Barbara gets the male voice right in her new book, Courage. And she is writing what she knows. She hails from the South side of Chicago, where her book is set. 

What do you think? Would you be open to reading a book done by an ‘outsider’ if it were researched and vetted properly? Let me know by replying to this letter, or posting in the comments section on Barbara’s vid tomorrow on our YOUTUBE channel.

Barbara also did me a solid without knowing it. Luckily for me her favorite food is spaghetti! Mine too. At last I got to eat something I love, even if it was blue.

Below a special moment from the video.

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
My favorite food on the planet..well minus the ‘eyes!’


Posted in Acceptance, Books, choose acceptance, Creativity, PLAY, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind the Vids, Claire Harfield, BBQ sauce and Triscuits

Claire Hartfield uses stories that explore the past to create a brighter future. Her latest book, A Few Red Drops, looks at the various racial, financial and political conditions that came together to create the Chicago race riots of 1919.

What I love about Claire’s book is that it is a primer on prevention. By focusing on what created the event, rather than just the event itself, it can be used to disrupt and better current tensions to prevent the violence that pervades our country. True to her mission, Claire’s book uses the past to help us better our future. If we’re willing to use it that way. (Too modest to recommend it for our book review this week, she chose another book, We Are Okay, which you’ll hear about on Thursday’s vid.)

A Few Red Drops reminds me of what my Gramps used to say, “Money doesn’t care who owns it.” Seen from that lens the poor, be it Irish,  Black, White or whomever, have more in common than not–a desperate desire to survive, even thrive.

Part of the key to choosing acceptance more often it seems, is the ability to focus more on our similarities than our differences.

What we’re beginning to see with our play experiment is that by laughing and sharing a common goal, such as getting out of an escape room, we focus on our similar needs, or on the strengths we each bring to the task, not our differences or weaknesses. We see our commonality.

Maybe if schools brought in more play, such as an escape room exercise once a week, or fun team building events, our kids would grow up choosing acceptance more often.

What do you think? Please share your thoughts with me either by replying to this letter or commenting on one of my channels. (Links below.)

If you haven’t tried an escape room yet, I highly recommend it!

For those of you who haven’t watched our interviews yet, Christina takes perverse pleasure, as do our guests, in making both of us eat weird stuff related to our guests’ preferences. It’s all part of the torture, er game, of acceptance. Here I’m eating a Triscuit dipped in BBQ sauce.

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance
 

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Purple Giraffes


Posted in Acceptance, choose acceptance, Creativity, Empowerment, PLAY, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids: Laura Jimenez, Tossing Books, and Blue Tamales

Laura Jimenez, a prof at Boston University, walks around with a bullseye painted on her back. That’s because she’s the voice behind the popular and controversial blog BookToss.

Book Toss tells its readers which books to toss, to keep, or to share. Laura has lambasted some pretty popular books, such as Wonder. Laura feels that Auggie’s attempts to make others feel comfortable in the face of his deformity is a form of ableism. It’s not his job to make his deformity palatable for others.

No Easy Book Love

Her quest to shed light on creators and books that reveal what it’s like to be the ‘other,’ and toss books that continue to perpetuate an outdated, or harmful point of view, made her perfect for our Acceptance Game.

While having fun, we touched upon how play can allow for serious topics to be discussed, and she gave us a practical tip on how to evaluate books, movies etc in terms of whether they validate racism, sexism, ableism etc. or not. And I gotta tell you, it’s not easy to spot some of these things if they’re outside of your immediate experience.

Her take on Wonder really threw me at first.  As Mike Moody, a writer with a craniofacial disorder similar to Auggie’s said in a School LiIbrary Journal article, Initiatives such as Choose Kind “[force] marginalised (sic) people to be ever gracious and polite in the face of people who ignore, mock, or vilify us.

Gotta admit, before we interviewed Laura, I only saw the Choose Kind movement as positive. But I’m learning every movement’s meaning is in the eye of the beholder. Nothing works in every situation for every person. Even choosing acceptance has its limits.

Because Christina and I continue to explore the limits of acceptance, please share an experience with me where choosing to accept someone or something was the wrong response. We value your experiences.

Below a special moment from the video. Watch here.

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.  
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Purple Tamales


Posted in Acceptance, choose acceptance, Empowerment, PLAY, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.

Behind The Vids: Elisa Gall, Inclusion and Play

This week we’re playing the Acceptance Game with Elisa Gall.

Elisa is the Youth Collection Development Librarian at Deerfield Public Library in Deerfield, IL and is also a contributor to the Reading While White blog. (One of the best blogs about diversity and inclusion period, and esp if you fit the title’s demographic.)

Reading While White’s Mission:
We are White librarians organizing to confront racism in the field of children’s and young adult literature. We are committed to working in the ongoing struggle for authenticity and visibility in books. We are learning, and hold ourselves responsible for understanding how our Whiteness impacts our perspectives and our behavior as we strive to advocate for this movement.

Because Elisa’s passion is inclusion and empowering underrepresented voices, we wanted her to help us test our theory that play makes it easier to choose acceptance. That play creates a safe space where tough and honest conversations can be had.

Watch this week and let us know what you think. Does playing with others allow acceptance to flourish?

Please spread the word about our project/channel and encourage others to subscribe to this newsletter and/or our YouTube Channel if you think they would speak to them.

Because we view our channel as a shared experience, we’d love it if you’d send us suggestions of what you’d like to explore next on this journey. Ex. You want us to look at how personal identity plays a part in choosing acceptance. You may even know someone who can help lead us along this path. If so, brilliant! You can send us names/contact info, video ideas, and whatever else you can think of by replying to this letter, or tweeting me, or posting a comment on our YouTube channel. We can use all the help we can get.
 
#ChooseAcceptance

Purple Passion of the Fortnight:
Watch the video to find out why…


Posted in Acceptance, choose acceptance, Inspired Creativity, PLAY, Self-Acceptance, Thinking Outside The Box by with no comments yet.